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Evaluating Web Resources  

Last Updated: Aug 20, 2014 URL: http://researchguides.wcu.edu/EvaluatingWeb Print Guide Email Alerts

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Welcome

This guide has been created to help you evaluate information found on the web. This home page presents a brief overview of how to evaluate web resources. Please select the tab at the top of this page entitled In-depth Evaluation for greater detail and explanation of the website evaluation process. Please select the tab entitled Trusted Web Resources to view descriptions and links of a sample of suggested websites.

      
     

    A Quick Approach

    ABCs of Evaluating Websites

    Audience

    • To whom is the site directed - children, adults, students; a certain ethnicity, gender, or political affiliation?
    • Is it understandable by the layman, or is it highly technical requiring specialized knowledge?

    Authority

    • Is the author of the site listed?
    • Can you determine his/her expertise?
    • Is contact information given - phone number, adress, e-mail?
    • With what organization is he/she associated?

    Bias

    • Does the language, tone, or treatment of its subject give the site a particular slant or bias?
    • Is the site objective?
    • Is it designed to sway opinion?  Organizational affiliation can often indicate bias.

    Currency

    • Is the site up-to-date with working links?
    • Are dates given for when it was created and last updated?
    • Is the topic current?

    Scope

    • Is the site an in-depth study of the topic going several pages deep, or is it a superficial, single-page look at the subject?
    • Are statistics and sources referenced properly cited?
    • Does the site offer unique information not found anywhere else, e.g., print sources?

    Credit for this section is given to Carol Oshel at McDermott Library, University of Texas at Dallas.

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