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Hunter Library
Research Guides
Western Carolina University

Mathematics

Mathematics Style Guides

Mathematics journals may have their own "house" style.  This means that they often use their own slightly revised version of a common standard style, such Chicago/Turabian, AMS, or MAA.  Information about this can generally be found on the publisher's website under the "Information for Authors" (or similar) section of the journal.

Below are some common types of citing styles in mathematics:

Citing Non-standard Items

Citing non-standard items, like figures or illustrations, can be difficult.  If your citation style is journal-specific, check the "instructions for authors" section for information.

Here's an example of ways figures may be cited in Chicago Style.

Citing in text from an article, book, newspaper, etc.

For figures, tables, etc., in the Author-Date Style, use the full name (except for figure, abbreviate that to fig.) of the type of item:  map. plate, table, fig., etc.  Give the page number first, then the illustration number.  Ex.  (O'Connell 2007, 68, fig. 6) or (Himes 2017, 24, map 7).

For figures, tables, etc., in the Notes-Bibliography Style, use the full name (except for figure, abbreviate that to fig.) of the type of item:  map. plate, table, fig., etc.  Give the page number first, then the illustration number.  Ex.  Edward O'Connell, Public Health in the Northeast (New York: Queens Publishing, 2001), 72, table 5.

Additional information regarding citing sources in bibliographies or reference lists can be found in 26.1.3 of the Chicago Manual of Style.